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Sunday, August 9, 2009

What Was Said to the Rose


The 13th century Persian poet Jalaluddin Rumi believed the spirit devolves from the Divine then experiences an evolutionary process that brings it back, ever nearer and nearer to the same Divine. He believed all matter obeys this law ~ this urge to reunite with the Divine ~ which Rumi calls Love.

Rumi (1207-1273) was an Islamic jurist, theologian and mystic. He remains widely read throughout the Middle East, and for several years now his translated works have gained huge popularity around the world.

Here is another Rumi poem ~ “What Was Said to the Rose” ~ read by one of Rumi’s leading western translators and interpreters, Coleman Barks. The poem reads in part:

. . . whatever lets the pomegranate flower blush
like a human face,
that is being said to me now. I blush.
Whatever put eloquence in language,
That’s happening here.

Click here for the text of the poem. You might also enjoy a reading of Rumi's "Love Dogs" ~ one of my favorites ~ by clicking here.

1 comment:

Smarts said...

Both incredibly moving. Thank you for sharing. Namaste.